A Travellerspoint blog

Entries about desert

Arrival

Arrival and First Day

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Welcoming in The Year of the Dog.

Welcoming in The Year of the Dog.

Leaving Hong Kong.

Leaving Hong Kong.

We departed from Hong Kong just a few minutes after the arrival of the Year of the Dog. Probably not the most fortuitous start to a Chinese New Year. The usual firework display across Victoria Harbour had been cancelled out of respect for the nineteen victims of one of Hong Kong's worst ever bus crashes which had occurred six days earlier on February tenth. In addition, my previous four days of teaching at school had been devoid of any children, as all primary school and kindergarten children were urged to stay at home, due to a nasty outbreak of influenza.

Our journey to Namibia was on board Ethiopian Airlines. We would travel for ten hours to Addis Ababa Airport, then change planes for a further five hour journey to Windhoek. This was our first time on Ethiopian Airlines and we found it pretty good. Or at least for someone like me, who really does not like flying, certainly no worse than any other airline. The highlight was the Ethiopian beer - Habesha cold gold - served with each meal. We are developing a taste for African beer.

Peter on board with his Habesha beer.

Peter on board with his Habesha beer.

Addis Ababa Airport is quite small and very busy. It struggles to cope with the number of travellers passing through it. As we took off on the second flight towards Windhoek, we had good views over Addis Ababa, a city we have yet to visit.

Flying over Addis Ababa.

Flying over Addis Ababa.

Flying over Addis Ababa.

Flying over Addis Ababa.

When we arrived in Hosea Kutako International Airport, we were met by a representative of tok tokkie shuttle service. We had pre-booked them to take us to our first hotel, the Hilton in the centre of Windhoek. Namibia is not great on public transport and we were not hiring a car, so had to rely on pre-booked shuttles to get from A to B. Tok tokkie seemed to be pretty reliable.

Windhoek's airport is called after Chief Hosea Kutako. Kutako was born in 1870 and became a founding member of Namibia's first nationalist party, SWANU. During the 1950's and 1960's, Kutako petitioned the United Nations to help end South African rule and help Namibia gain independence.

Getting off the plane in Windhoek.

Getting off the plane in Windhoek.

Hosea Kutako International Airport, Windhoek.

Hosea Kutako International Airport, Windhoek.

Windhoek's International airport is around forty kilometres from the city of Windhoek. The journey from the airport passed through a lot of greenery and distant hills. Our driver told us they had been having quite a bit of rain in recent days, so I'm not sure if it is always so green. The driver was pleased about the rain, as he told us he kept a herd of cattle and, of course, needed the rain for their grass.

On the journey from the airport.

On the journey from the airport.

By the time we reached the Hilton Hotel we were extremely tired, but our check in did not go at all smoothly. The girl who checked us in simply gave us a room key, but no information. We pointed out that our two night stay came with dinner and breakfast and asked for details. She claimed it was room only. This led to a bit of a fight, ending only when the receptionist admitted our deal possibly included dinner but refusing to accept it included breakfast. She promised she would double check everything for us, but of course, she did not, so, despite our tiredness, we had to contact the headquarters of the Hilton group in the U.S. ourselves with a complaint and they, fortunately, got back to us quite quickly telling us our deal included two dinners and two breakfasts. We returned to the reception with the reply we had received and breakfast was added to our reservation, but we still could not get any information about where we could eat dinner or what we were entitled to. Not the best of starts. Feeling a bit stressed we took ourselves off to the Hilton's rooftop pool for a calming swim.

Our Room.

Our Room.

View from Our Window.

View from Our Window.

Calming down in the pool.

Calming down in the pool.

At the roof top pool.

At the roof top pool.

View over Windhoek from the pool.

View over Windhoek from the pool.

That night we ate in the hotel's Ekipa Restaurant where we had no problem convincing them our dinner was included in our deal. We tried a local Namibian food buffet. We had not realised by this stage that the hotel was not so good at keeping things hot on a buffet. Still service in the restaurant was really friendly, unlike at the hotel's reception. Most of the food was quite ordinary: chicken, hake, vegetables, spinach. However, I was brave enough to try the mopane worms. These are not actually worms; they are caterpillars of a kind of emperor moth known as Gonimbrasia Belina. Apparently they are highly nutritious. For some reason I expected them to be crispy and crunchy, but they were not. When I bit into one, the soft squishy insides shot into my mouth. I cannot say I enjoyed this experience very much and I certainly won't be repeating it. Yeuk!!! Thank goodness we had lots of beer to wash the food down with. I was on the Hansa draft and the bottled Tafel lager. Both were excellent.

We are getting on a bit age wise, truth be told, and we made no attempt to see Windhoek on our arrival day. We left it till the next day when we would have had a chance to recover from our long journey to Africa. I must say our room at the Hilton was very quiet, peaceful and comfortable and we slept really well here.

Me eating a mopane worm.

Me eating a mopane worm.

Mopane worms on the buffet next to some sort of gizzard dish.

Mopane worms on the buffet next to some sort of gizzard dish.

A more sensible diner he stuck to the chicken and the fish.

A more sensible diner he stuck to the chicken and the fish.

Posted by irenevt 00:41 Archived in Namibia Tagged desert namibia seals Comments (6)

Across the Desert.

Getting to Swakopmund.

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Next day we had booked a Carlo's Shuttle to take us from Windhoek all the way to Swakopmund. We were very happy with this service as it would pick us up from our hotel and drop us right at our next hotel, so no messing around with luggage for us. Our pick up was scheduled for around one in the afternoon, so we still had a morning to enjoy Windhoek and sort out our hotel bill!!!

After breakfast, we walked to the nearby Namibian Craft Centre which has been in existence since 1990 and occupies the site of Windhoek's old brewery. As well as having a wide variety of different Namibian handicrafts this complex also has a cafe and a bar called Chopsi's.

At the Namibian Craft Centre.

At the Namibian Craft Centre.

Tall giraffes at the centre.

Tall giraffes at the centre.

Shy Giraffes at the centre.

Shy Giraffes at the centre.

Chopsi's Bar.

Chopsi's Bar.

Namibian Craft Centre.

Namibian Craft Centre.

After visiting the craft centre, we returned to the hotel for our last swim before check out. Of course when we did check out, the bill was way too much and the meals that should have been included were added on as extras. After a rather unpleasant fight, we eventually got things sorted out, but it was not the happiest way to depart and spoiled what was otherwise a very comfortable and happy stay. This is a hotel that needs to sort itself out. Our shuttle arrived on time and took us to a central bus station where we boarded a second shuttle for Swakopmund.

Bye bye Hilton, Windhoek.

Bye bye Hilton, Windhoek.

The journey to Swakopmund takes around four or five hours. We travelled along the Trans-Kalahari Highway which apparently runs all the way from Walvis Bay in Namibia to Johannesburg and Pretoria in South Africa. The scenery at first was quite green with distant rolling hills. I saw several herds of domesticated cattle and goats. There were also some buffalo with long, curving horns. I also saw some wild deer and ostriches. One of the things that fascinated me was the huge termite mounds that lined the sides of the road - some of them were incredibly high.

On this journey we passed through the town of Okahandja and were fortunate enough on our return journey to pass by its huge craft market. We stopped on the edge of the town of Usakos. Across from the service station area a football match was in full swing. Near the service area I admired a lovely garden filled with strange spiky plants.

Football match on the edge of Usakos.

Football match on the edge of Usakos.

House and garden, Usakos.

House and garden, Usakos.

After leaving Usakos the scenery became much drier as we entered the Namib Desert. The ground sparkled in the bright sunlight due to the many pieces of quartz and other stones that covered the it. In the distance we could see the outline of the Spitzkoppe. A mountain range that literally translates from the German as 'pointed dome' and rises dramatically from the flat, parched surroundings of the Namib Desert. These granite peaks are more than 120 million years old and rise to 5,853 feet above sea level. They are famous for interesting rock formations and examples of bushmen artwork painted onto their rocks.

Passing Spitzkoppe.

Passing Spitzkoppe.

Passing Spitzkoppe.

Passing Spitzkoppe.

As we neared Swakopmund we passed some uranium mines. The Namib Desert is rich in uranium and Namibia was once the fourth largest uranium producer in the world. Production has declined in recent times as nuclear power has fallen in popularity since the Fukihima Daiichi Disaster in Japan in 2011.

Uranium mine near Swakopmund.

Uranium mine near Swakopmund.

One of the things I liked about Carlo's Shuttles was it drops everyone where they want to go, so we had a tour around the suburbs of Swakopmund on our way in. Quite interesting as we would have no reason to go here normally, but I like to see real places where people actually live. Eventually we arrived at our hotel the AHA Beach Hotel near the seafront in Swakopmund. The receptionist here was so friendly and helpful; it was completely different to checking in in Windhoek. We were given a lovely room with a balcony. We deposited our stuff, then headed to the hotel roof with its small pool and spectacular views over the seafront. The sun was just starting to go down and we watched it for a while before heading down a floor and enjoying sun-downers in the little hotel bar. Later we ate a delicious meal in the hotel restaurant. My husband had wiener schnitzel and I had pork medallions in a Dijon mustard sauce. The restaurant is called Anchor Point as it stands on a site that was once occupied by a huge German radio transmitter. The anchor points secured the guy ropes that held the eighty-six metre high radio mast in place. This transmitter enabled the Germans to stay in radio contact with Berlin during the First World War. When Union troops entered South West Africa near the end of the war, the Germans destroyed the transmitter to prevent it falling into enemy hands.

Our room.

Our room.

View from our balcony with an anchor point on the right.

View from our balcony with an anchor point on the right.

View from our roof towards Swakopmund Pier.

View from our roof towards Swakopmund Pier.

Me by our roof top pool.

Me by our roof top pool.

View over Tiger Reef campsite and restaurant. The structure in the water used to be a rail line.

View over Tiger Reef campsite and restaurant. The structure in the water used to be a rail line.

Sunset over the Atlantic Ocean.

Sunset over the Atlantic Ocean.

Looking towards an anchor point.

Looking towards an anchor point.

Sun-downers in the bar.

Sun-downers in the bar.

Sundown.

Sundown.

A delicious dinner in the Anchor Point Restaurant.

A delicious dinner in the Anchor Point Restaurant.

Posted by irenevt 19:35 Archived in Namibia Tagged desert namibia windhoek swakopmund Comments (4)

Along The Skeleton Coast.

Shipwrecks, Desert and History Lessons.

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Next day we had booked ourselves a day trip with Open Space Tours up the Skeleton Coast as far as Cape Cross. We turned out to be the only people on the tour. We were driven by an American man called Jay, who was married to a Namibian woman and had lived in Namibia for many years.

The Skeleton Coast refers to the northern coast of Namibia and the southern coast of Angola. Namibian Bushmen refer to this area as "The Land God Made in Anger", while Portuguese sailors used to call it "The Gates of Hell". The name Skeleton Coast was first used by John Henry Marsh when he used it as the title for his book about the shipwreck of the Dunedin Star.

This area is known for stormy seas, dense fogs and inhospitable desert. The shores used to be littered with the skeletons of whales and seals killed by the whaling industry here, which is probably why John Henry Marsh choose the name Skeleton Coast. Several shipwrecks line the Skeleton Coast victims of its stormy waters.

Our first stop on our trip was at the wreck of the Zelia. The Zeila got stranded in the early morning of the 25th of August 2008 about fourteen kilometres south of Henties Bay. This fishing trawler had been sold as scrap metal to an Indian company by Hangana Fishing of Walvis Bay. However, the Zelia got stranded when it broke free from its towing line while on its way to Bombay.

Me and the Zelia shipwreck.

Me and the Zelia shipwreck.

Peter and the Zelia.

Peter and the Zelia.

Close up of the wreck.

Close up of the wreck.

Both of us with the wreck.

Both of us with the wreck.

As we made our way back to the car, we were approached by two Namibian men selling some stones they had found in the Namib Desert. They had some pretty ones and I bought myself a desert rose like the ones I had seen in Charley's Desert Tours.

Seller of desert stones.

Seller of desert stones.

Next we drove into Henties Bay. This town is called after Major Hendrik "Henty" Stefanus van der Merwe who discovered the place in 1929. He had been hunting for rhinoceros in order to sell their skeletons to an American museum, but he ran out of water and after a long walk found fresh water here. He decided to return to this area and build a wooden hut near the riverbed that saved his life. He spent his time here fishing and relaxing. Slowly others began to build in this area and it gradually developed into a small town, particularly popular with anglers due to the rich fishing nearby. One of Henties Bay's sights is its gallows. As there were no cleaning services in Henties Bay, it became very difficult to keep it clean and this led to a great deal of bickering among the people who lived or holidayed here, so in 1978 two of the first permanent residents of Henties Bay, Frank Atkinson and Willie Cilliers, attached a rope and a noose to an old tree stump with a warning to keep the town and beach clean – or else! This, of course, was just a joke, but the gallows quickly became an attraction in its own right.

The gallows at Henties Bay.

The gallows at Henties Bay.

We stopped on the beach not far out of Henties Bay just to look up and down the coastline. It seemed to stretch endlessly - flat and barren - a shipwrecked sailor's nightmare. How many men foresaw their own deaths when washed up there? And yet, perhaps for that reason, the area also held a sort of fascination - a fight for survival, a battle against the elements.

Peter and I in the wilderness.

Peter and I in the wilderness.

Peter with our tour guide Jay.

Peter with our tour guide Jay.

Back in the car and next stop was Cape Cross. Some people visit here due to its seal colony, but I personally was more interested in the crosses placed here by Portuguese explorers in the fifteenth century.

Our first stop was the ticket office which mercifully had toilets. Yeah! And outside it there were some bones from the carcass of a whale - the sort of thing that gave the Skeleton Coast its name.

Peter and the whale.

Peter and the whale.

Then we went to the seals, truth be told we were a bit sealed out after our cruise of the day before. There were hundreds of them basking, fighting, sleeping. You name it they were doing it. Visitors are supposed to pass through the seals on an enclosed walkway, but seals can get on it. Our guide said they jump onto it, though I remain unconvinced that seals can jump. They don't seem made for such an action. Anyway there was a seal on the walkway and it bit an Italian tourist and he had to limp back to his car covered in blood and our guide told him he would have to have a rabies shot and for me suddenly seals were not so cute anymore and I decided I really was more interested in the history than the wildlife.

I wanted to look at this marker, but was too scared of the seals to go near it.

I wanted to look at this marker, but was too scared of the seals to go near it.

Seals, seals, seals.

Seals, seals, seals.

And even more seals, seals, seals.

And even more seals, seals, seals.

And seals.

And seals.

Cape Cross is called Cape Cross because in 1486, Portuguese seafarer and explorer, Diego Câo, arrived here and placed in the ground a stone pillar topped by a cross. This marker established Portugal's claim to the territory. Câo was on a voyage aimed at trying to find a sea route around Africa to India. His cross marker became a landmark and an important navigational aid. This was to be Câo's last voyage. He disappeared without trace on it and, to this present day, no-one has any idea what happened to him.

Many years later in 1893, Captain Becker of the German flagship Falke rediscovered this Portuguese cross and had it sent to Wilhelmshaven in Germany. German Emperor, Wilhelm II, insisted that a replica should be made and re-erected near the site of Câo's original cross. The actual original of Câo's cross is now in the German Museum for Technology in Berlin. In 1980 as the result of an initiative led by Director of the State Museum in Windhoek, CG Coetzee, a new cross made of Namib dolerite was erected on the exact site of Diogo Cão's original cross. In addition, architect François Malan designed three information platforms to celebrate the five hundred year anniversary of Diego Cão's historic voyage.

Peter with the historical crosses.

Peter with the historical crosses.

And with the other one.

And with the other one.

Both of us at Cape Cross.

Both of us at Cape Cross.

Both of us at Cape Cross.

Both of us at Cape Cross.

At one point in its history Cape Cross was known as a centre of guano production. Guano is the waste left by fish-eating birds. It can be used as a fertilizer and in the manufacture of explosives. Guano was once so valuable it was known as white gold. At one point there was a 21KM railway track from Cape Cross to a bay where ships waited to be loaded up with guano.

We left Cape Cross and headed off into the desert where we found beautiful wide open vistas and lots of lizards. Salt crystals are available for sale at the sides of the road.

In the desert.

In the desert.

In the desert.

In the desert.

In the desert.

In the desert.

Salt crystals for sale.

Salt crystals for sale.

After leaving the desert we drove back almost to Swakopmund noticing some interesting mirages on route. We stopped for a picnic lunch of beer, filled rolls, chocolate and fruit.

Picnic in the desert.

Picnic in the desert.

Then we drove back via the location. Locations were areas black Namibians were forced to move to under the Apartheid regime. Now they are no longer forced to live there, but some are trapped there through lack of money and resources.

The location.

The location.

The location.

The location.

Back in our hotel, we cooled down with a swim then headed into town to do some souvenir shopping. I bought several wood carvings of people and animals. Then, although we had not seen the big ten or even the big five, we got acquainted with the big six - a six pack with beers from South Africa, Lesotho, Botswana, Mozambique, Zambia and Tanzania. Peter's idea of heaven.

The big six.

The big six.

The big six.

The big six.

We ate dinner in the Brauhaus, a German restaurant in the centre of town. This restaurant has excellent food and a great selection of bottled and draft beers. Then we wandered home via some interesting art and craft shops.

Me in the Brauhaus.

Me in the Brauhaus.

The Brauhaus.

The Brauhaus.

Peter in the Brauhaus.

Peter in the Brauhaus.

Posing with arty, farty shops.

Posing with arty, farty shops.

And again.

And again.

And again.

And again.

My turn.

My turn.

Posted by irenevt 06:07 Archived in Namibia Tagged desert ship seals crosses wrecks Comments (5)

The Ups and Downs of Namibia

A Day Trip to Sandwich Harbour

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We had a lovely hotel in Swakopmund and it did a very good breakfast, however, because we were always in a rush to get ready for our tour, we never really got a chance to fully appreciate it - that all changed on our Sandwich Harbour tour day. Finally, we had a tour that left later and a morning to ourselves, so we ate a leisurely breakfast then went for a swim. Well, I say swim, but the hotel pool was more of a place to cool down rather than a place to swim, nonetheless it took a very good photo.

My husband took this free time as a challenge to get on with his big six and he began with a Tanzanian Kilimanjaro beer - the perfect poolside beer and indeed the perfect in-pool beer, too.

Peter with his Kilimajaro by the pool ....

Peter with his Kilimajaro by the pool ....

and in the pool.

and in the pool.

Around midday we were collected from our hotel and driven back to Walvis Bay where we changed vehicle, collected more passengers then headed out on our tour. We began on the Walvis Bay salt pans; our guide joked that all the world's snow is actually made in Namibia then exported to the North Pole etc. From our photos you can see why he said this.

Salt Production in Walvis Bay.

Salt Production in Walvis Bay.

Salt factory.

Salt factory.

Our driver drove us straight up a tall sand dune so we could get a good view over the salt pans. It is a surreal sight with salt encrusted stretches of sand and pink tinged pools of water stretching all around. Salt pans, are shallow artificial ponds created to extract salt from sea water. The seawater evaporates naturally from the ponds, leaving the salt behind for harvest. High algae concentrations affect the colour of these ponds. In the case of Walvis Bay, the pond water turns pink. The algae here is devoured by water-birds; in Walvis Bay the algae attracts large flocks of flamingos. These tend to be of two main kinds: the greater and the lesser. The greater flamingo is taller and lighter in colour; the lesser flamigo is smaller but more brightly coloured.

Salt pans and pink water.

Salt pans and pink water.

Peter in his surreal world.

Peter in his surreal world.

Flamingos.

Flamingos.

Flamingos.

Flamingos.

It takes an experienced driver to get to Sandwich Harbour. First, you must drive along a very long stretch of beach with the waves creeping ever closer to you. Then if the tide is so far in that the beach is impassable, or if you are just secretly a sensation seeker, you must drive up and down and up and down and up and down even more over the sand dunes. We experienced both of these scenarios: the beach on the way there; the dunes on the return journey.

Driving the beach.

Driving the beach.

When South Africa was forced to grant independence to Namibia in 1990, it retained control of Walvis Bay and there was a border region around this area. Our drive along the beach took us right to the former border line. Our driver told us that he was brought up in Windhoek and used to play for the rugby team there. Once when they had a match in Walvis Bay, the border officials put the whole team in prison overnight on a trumped up charge of not having the correct entry documentation. They then released them one hour before the game. The whole procedure was to mess with their heads and render them unable to play rugby.

Peter at the old border.

Peter at the old border.

Later in the desert one of our guides uncovered a Namib sand gecko. This is a species of small lizard that inhabits the dry areas of Angola and Namibia. It has very large eyes and only comes out at night. Its skin helps it stay camouflaged among the desert sand. It is translucent, and some of its internal organs can be seen through its skin. This gecko has webbed toes, to help it burrow easily in the sand. After we had all had a look at it, the guide placed it on the desert floor and it dug its way rapidly back under the sand.

A Namib sand gecko.

A Namib sand gecko.

Sandwich Harbour was once a small port which made its living through whaling and fishing. The buildings of Sandwich Harbour have long since fallen into ruins and are covered over by the desert sands. Only some of their rooftops are still visible.

The former port of Sandwich Harbour buried under the sand.

The former port of Sandwich Harbour buried under the sand.

The former port of Sandwich Harbour buried under the sand.

The former port of Sandwich Harbour buried under the sand.

There is a lagoon next to the sea in sandwich harbour. I climbed up a tall dune to get a view over it. The climb was torture. I made it about half way up and my legs felt so sore that I thought they were going to seize up. A group of French tourists who had climbed up before me were coming down and passed me saying: 'Don't give up. You can do it. Almost there." so I pushed myself on. After a while, I could no longer even stand up as I kept slipping back down the dune. Then I realised I had lost my hat and had to go back for it, then crawl back up once again. When I was nearly at the top, a French lady who was at the top called down that she would wait for me if I wanted my photo taken. I said: 'Great, thanks.' then began to slip back down. I crawled back up. I slipped back down. This continued for some time. Eventually, I did actually make it and posed for my photo with my heart pumping so fast I thought I was about to die. The French lady, who had waited for me, took off and ran, and I mean ran, up another dune nearby. I was left alone with a rather spectacular view. Then I started to try and go down. All the way up I had looked for hard firm sand I would not slide back down on and struggled most on the loose sand that fell downwards as soon as I stepped on it. Going down was the opposite. On the hard sand, I went down so fast I lost all control over my legs, but on the loose sand I could throw myself over and make my way down more slowly. The French lady who had taken my photo came tearing down at speed after me, calling to me: 'Come on let's go.' but I could only get down slowly. The funny thing was that when I reached the bottom, Peter whose eyesight is getting very poor praised me for looking so athletic on my descent. 'That was not me. That was that French lady over there', I said, but he would not believe me. It was lunch time and one of the guides came over and gave me a glass of wine. I felt I had truly earned it.

The dune I climbed.

The dune I climbed.

Half way - don't give up.

Half way - don't give up.

View over the lagoon from halfway up.

View over the lagoon from halfway up.

I made it!!!

I made it!!!

I really did.

I really did.

View from the top lagoon side.

View from the top lagoon side.

View from the top desert side.

View from the top desert side.

That athletic French woman runs up another one.

That athletic French woman runs up another one.

Safely back at the bottom I had wine and sandwiches and chicken wings and it was all lovely - except everything tasted like sand. I had sand in my hair; sand in my eyes; sand in my ears and sand up my nose!!!

A well earned wine!!!

A well earned wine!!!

After lunch it was back in the car and we drove to the top of a dune, then steeply straight back down; then up and down and up and down. I have heard of this. I think it is called wadi bashing. I have never had the slightest desire to do it, but actually it was not so bad and we stopped now and again to look at the views.

On top of the world.

On top of the world.

I believe I can fly.

I believe I can fly.

Enjoying the dunes.

Enjoying the dunes.

Steady on his feet.

Steady on his feet.

Desert living.

Desert living.

On the drive back we saw a plant called nara melon which thrives in the dry desert conditions and is eaten by some desert animals. We had been told we may see some wildlife such as jackals, hyena or deer, instead we saw, you guessed it ..... seals. Might even have been Nicholas again. Who knows???

Nara melon.

Nara melon.

Nara melon.

Nara melon.

Seals, seals and more seals.

Seals, seals and more seals.

Our tour providers.

Our tour providers.

Back home Peter had another go at the big six with a Maluti from Lesotho and a Castle from South Africa.

A Maluti from Lesotho.

A Maluti from Lesotho.

A Castle from South Africa.

A Castle from South Africa.

Then that night back in Swakopmund we ate dinner in The Tug Restaurant, located at the beginning of Swakopmund's pier. This restaurant is built around a tug boat called Danie Hugo which was constructed back in my home town in Port Glasgow, Scotland in 1959. It was owned by The Republic of South Africa Railways and Harbours Administration, Cape Town and after several years of service was broken up at Walvis Bay in 1985 before being converted into a restaurant in 1993. We had a very pleasant and enjoyable meal here.

The Tug.

The Tug.

The Tug.

The Tug.

Posted by irenevt 04:55 Archived in Namibia Tagged desert cars namibia dunes flamingos Comments (4)

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